WASHINGTON, April 5, 2019 – The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of pet chickens in Coconino County, Arizona. This is the first case of virulent Newcastle disease in Arizona. 

This case is believed to be connected to the current outbreak of virulent Newcastle disease in California, as tests show the virus is almost identical to the virus causing disease in California.  Since May 2018, more than 400 cases of Newcastle disease have been confirmed as part of this southern California outbreak, primarily in backyard exhibition birds.

Virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern.  No human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products. Properly cooked poultry products are safe to eat.  In very rare instances people working directly with sick birds can become infected. Symptoms are usually very mild, and limited to conjunctivitis and/or influenza-like symptoms. Infection is easily prevented by using standard personal protective equipment.  

APHIS is working with the Arizona Department of Agriculture to respond to the finding. Federal and State partners are also conducting additional surveillance and testing in the area.  

It is essential that all bird owners follow good biosecurity practices to help protect their birds from infectious diseases.  These include simple steps like washing hands and scrubbing boots before and after entering a poultry area; cleaning and disinfecting tires and equipment before moving them off the property; and isolating any birds returning from shows for 30 days before placing them with the rest of the flock.

In addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to their veterinarian or to State veterinary officials.  Additional information on biosecurity for all poultry flocks can be found at www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/defendtheflock

Additional background

Virulent Newcastle disease is a contagious and fatal viral disease affecting the respiratory, nervous and digestive systems of birds and poultry. The disease is so virulent that many birds and poultry die without showing any clinical signs. A death rate of almost 100 percent can occur in unvaccinated poultry flocks. Virulent Newcastle disease can infect and cause death even in vaccinated poultry.

Clinical signs of virulent Newcastle disease include: sudden death and increased death loss in the flock; sneezing; gasping for air; nasal discharge; coughing; greenish, watery diarrhea; decreased activity; tremors; drooping wings; twisting of the head and neck; circling; complete stiffness; and swelling around the eyes and neck.  Images of some of these signs are available here.

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Join NAGA President Peg Ballou for this important broadcast on ways to discourage waterfowl and other birds from congregating on your farm or club. Your participation is requested with ideas on products, procedures and plans to share with other industry members. ... See MoreSee Less

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Websites that hold this kind of product are not endorsed or necessarily recommended, but the content is here to help you find products that may help deter nondesired birds from remaining around your area. Birdsbgone Laserbird Wildgoosechase Birdbarrier Agrilaser.

Additionally, I mentioned spikes on your posts, owl or swan decoys to deter birds congregating around pens. The swan decoys float in the pond and the incoming ducks and geese stay away. Apparently Swans don't play well with others. Huh, who knew?

And a better one of the metal spinner.

This is the tape I mentioned. Kinda like a mylar bag sliced into strips.

Hey, gang, I am attaching some pictures that wouldn't show on the livestream. This is one of the metal spinners I was talking about.

My problem is starlings and sparrows coming through the 2” net

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