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Study: Gene Editing to Control Avian Influenza

Gene editing may be able to help control the avian influenza virus in the future, according to the results of newly released research. On June 4, 2019, the Roslin Institute, an animal research institute at The University of Edinburgh, announced scientists used gene-editing techniques to stop the virus from spreading in chicken cells grown in … Continued

Minnesota Wild Bird Testing Yields Few A-I Answers

A year after deadly avian influenza hit Minnesota, testing of more than 6,000 wild birds has yielded little insight into the role, if any, that waterfowl and other species played in the outbreak.

As the state Department of Natural Resources plans to scale back testing efforts, state poultry growers urge continued vigilance, including testing different species of wild birds and using different methods, such as testing blood instead of droppings.

Preparing for the Worst: Steps to Take In Case of an AI Outbreak

The Health Committee of the North American Gamebird Association has been meeting each week to exchange and provide information on the latest outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H2N5). We’ve been cranking out a steady dose of tips on how to prevent and protect an outbreak from occurring on your place. But what should you be doing to be ready in case you suspect you have an outbreak on your farm?

Water Fowl, Water, and Avian Influenza

Wild ducks continue to be the top suspects for new outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) that have occurred in the western and central United States. While migrating waterfowl may not be responsible for the spread of the disease within small regional areas, the large distances between outbreak areas continue to lead experts in the field to believe that wild ducks are the most likely carrier.

Avian Influenza Could Head East with Fall Migration

Eastern U.S. poultry producers are bracing for the potential arrival of a deadly bird flu virus outbreak that farmers in the Midwest have struggled to stop. The fear is that if the virus isn’t already lurking undetected somewhere in the Atlantic Flyway, it could spread there this fall when wild ducks fly south for the winter or fly back north next spring.

Avian Influenza Could Last

Veterinarians are concerned that H2N5 Hi Path Avian Influenza will move eastward during fall migration, and ultimately be active for three to five years. (reports from the Associated Press and the Minneapolis Star Tribune.)

Avian Influenza Resources

As members of the North American Gamebird Association, we must be watchful of the resurgence of high-path Avian Influenza on the North American continent. This page provides information and resources you should monitor and research frequently to stay informed about the disease, its location and what you can do. It would be impossible to gather and present all information regarding to Avian Influenza in one location. The links at the bottom of this page will hopefully give you a good start on information yourself.

This page has been marked so it is visible for members only. If you know someone that needs access to this information, please encourage them to be come an NAGA Member today.

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The November/December issue of NAGA News will hit mailboxes any day now. If you can’t wait to read the hard copy, log in to northamericangamebird.com and read it online now! ... See MoreSee Less

The November/December issue of NAGA News will hit mailboxes any day now. If you can’t wait to read the hard copy, log in to northamericangamebird.com and read it online now!

Who is enjoying the September/October issue of NAGA News? 🙋 ... See MoreSee Less

Who is enjoying the September/October issue of NAGA News? 🙋

Happy Independence Day from all of us at #NAGA! ... See MoreSee Less

Happy Independence Day from all of us at #NAGA!

The July/August issue of NAGA News is hitting mailboxes this week. We hope you enjoy our latest issue! #NAGA ... See MoreSee Less

The July/August issue of NAGA News is hitting mailboxes this week. We hope you enjoy our latest issue! #NAGA

A NAGA member asks the following:

“I’m looking for a lab that can test quail and eggs. We are having low hatch rates. Can anyone recommend a lab?”

Please respond in the comments with a recommendation, or you’re welcome to message NAGA!
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Well have a call into the Utah lab that I made a phone call to a member and he recommended.... Guess will see if they call me back. the GA lab I cannot get any response to.

Contact your ag extension service

Contact Jeff Mayes, has helped me through a lot of hatching difficulties.

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