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Preparing for the Worst: Steps to Take In Case of an AI Outbreak

The Health Committee of the North American Gamebird Association has been meeting each week to exchange and provide information on the latest outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (H2N5). We’ve been cranking out a steady dose of tips on how to prevent and protect an outbreak from occurring on your place. But what should you be doing to be ready in case you suspect you have an outbreak on your farm?

Water Fowl, Water, and Avian Influenza

Wild ducks continue to be the top suspects for new outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (AI) that have occurred in the western and central United States. While migrating waterfowl may not be responsible for the spread of the disease within small regional areas, the large distances between outbreak areas continue to lead experts in the field to believe that wild ducks are the most likely carrier.

Avian Influenza Could Head East with Fall Migration

Eastern U.S. poultry producers are bracing for the potential arrival of a deadly bird flu virus outbreak that farmers in the Midwest have struggled to stop. The fear is that if the virus isn’t already lurking undetected somewhere in the Atlantic Flyway, it could spread there this fall when wild ducks fly south for the winter or fly back north next spring.

Avian Influenza Could Last

Veterinarians are concerned that H2N5 Hi Path Avian Influenza will move eastward during fall migration, and ultimately be active for three to five years. (reports from the Associated Press and the Minneapolis Star Tribune.)

AI Spreads Across Central Mexico

ANALYSIS – The highly pathogenic H7N3 Avian Influenza virus is spreading quickly across central Mexico, much to the frustration of the Mexican poultry industry. Chris Wright, writing for the ThePoultrySite, reports on the ANECA meeting held last week in Mexico.

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